Category Archives: Legal History

Last Survivor of the Transatlantic Slave Trade

The BBC this morning (25 March) reported that Hannah Durkin of the University of Newcastle had traced the last survivor of the transatlantic slave trade as one Matilda McCrear, who lived until 1940, dying in Selma, later famous for its … Continue reading

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Jesse Norman and Adam Smith

This blog has a strong interest in the Enlightenment in all its facets, but particularly in Scotland. Adam Smith was one of the most important writers of the period whose works and thinking remain of the greatest importance, going beyond … Continue reading

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Law and Enlightenment Edinburgh City Walk

On Friday 6 March, the Law and Enlightenment LLM class with some friends in Edinburgh went on a walking tour to look at some places associated with the Enlightenment and the law in Edinburgh. The walk took in a discussion … Continue reading

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“Precedents so scrawl’d and blurr’d …” New Exhibition at Yale Law Library Rare Books Collection

Books are the lawyer’s tools and the law student’s laboratory, and nothing brings this home better than the marks that they leave in their books. Over 30 such annotated and inscribed books from the Lillian Goldman Law Library are on … Continue reading

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British Legal History Conference 2021: Call for Papers

The theme of this conference will be “Law and Constitutional Change”. The call for papers is now live on the BLHC website: https://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/BLH-Conference-2021/ The website explains: 2021 will be a significant year in the “Decade of Centenaries” in Ireland, north and … Continue reading

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American Society for Legal History’s Peter Gonville Stein Book Award

Peter Gonville Stein Book Award American Society for Legal History The Peter Gonville Stein Book Award is awarded annually for the best book in non-US legal history written in English. This award is designed to recognize and encourage the further … Continue reading

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Peter Chiene Lecture. Reminder

This is to remind readers that the Chiene Lecture for 2020 will be delivered by Professor Humfress of St Andrews. The Lecture will be followed by a Reception in the Quad Teaching (formerly Lorimer) Room.

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Rare Book School: Yale Law Library

All legal historians know the importance of the work of Mike Widener in developing greater knowledge about rare books, particularly through the Rare Book School at Yale Law Library. He is offering it again this summer. See the note below: … Continue reading

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Peter Chiene Lecture

The next Peter Chiene Lecture will be delivered on 31 January by Professor Caroline Humfress of the University of St. Andrews at 17.30 in the Usha Kasera Lecture Theatre in Old College. Her title is “Beyond (Roman) Law and Empire”. … Continue reading

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David Armitage: George III and the Law of Nations

The second Berriedale Keith Lecture was delivered in Edinburgh on 5th December, 2019. The lecturer was Professor David Armitage of the History Department at Harvard https://scholar.harvard.edu/armitage/home. Professor Armitage talked on “George III and the Law of Nations” https://www.law.ed.ac.uk/news-events/events/george-iii-and-law-nations-david-armitage. The lecture … Continue reading

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