Ancient Law in Context – Workshop 6 – “Procedure”

Readers of this blog may be interested to know of the next ALC workshop to be held on January 29 – 30, 2016 in Edinburgh. Programme below:

Ancient Law in Context: Workshop 6

29 – 30 January 2016

University of Edinburgh

 

Programme

Friday 29 January

 

Venue: Old College [Neil MacCormick Room]

12.30 – 1pm: Arrival [Tea and Coffee]

 

Session 1

 

1 – 2pm: Jose Luis Alonso Rodriguez – “Etiam cum inique 

decernit: jurisdictional discretion in the Late Republic and the Early

Empire.”

 

2 – 3pm: Anna Dolganov – “Case-law and the work of judges in the Roman Empire.”

 

3 – 4pm: Jakub Urbanik – “Between arbitration and rescript procedure or the force of the imperial court.“

 

4 – 4.30pm: Tea, Coffee

 

4.30 – 5pm: Lina Girdvainyte – “C. Poppaeus Sabinus in Thessaly (IG IX 2.261, 15-35 CE): Territorial dispute resolution under Rome.”

 

5 – 5.30pm: Kimberley Czajkowski – “Trial narratives in Josephus.”

 

5.30pm – 6pm: Michael Crawford – “The Roman law of procedure, Ivo of Chartres, and the beginning of research on ancient slavery.”

 

6 – 7pm: Drinks

 

7.30 pm: Dinner at Ciao Roma

 

Saturday 30 January

 

Venue: HCA [G. 12, William Robertson Wing (The Old Medical School)]

 

9.30 – 10am: Tea, Coffee

 

Session 2

 

10 – 11am: Mirko Canevaro – “The Procedure of Demosthenes’ Against Leptines: How to Repeal (and Replace) an Existing Law.”

 

11 – 11.30am: Edward Harris – “The Legal Procedure of Demosthenes’ Against Meidias.”

 

11.30 – 12 noon: Pier Luigi Morbidoni – “Gaius, Inst. 3.55 and friends.”

 

12 noon – 12.30: Halcyon Weber – “Further thoughts on the existence of a ‘Liber quinquaginta decisionum.'”

 

12.30 – 1pm: Benedikt Eckhardt – “Manumissio per mensam.”

 

1pm: conclusion and lunch

 

***

Although this is a closed meeting, there are some spaces available for interested third parties wishing to join us for the sessions. Please email Paul du Plessis for more information.

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