Our students win prizes!

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Following the good news of Dr. Karen Baston’s nomination for a book prize, this blogger is delighted to congratulate Mr Kenneth Young and Mr Glauco Longoni. Mr Young won the Muirhead prize for the best overall performance in Civil law ordinary, while Mr Longoni won the forensic essay prize. Unfortunately, Mr Young could not attend the ceremony, so here follows two pictures of Mr Longoni accepting his prize.

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Karen Baston, Charles Areskine’s Library – nominated for prize

Readers of this Blog will be delighted to hear that Brill have nominated Karen Baston, Charles Areskine’s Library: Lawyers and Their Books at the Dawn of the Scottish Enlightenment for the De Long Book History Prize (see http://www.sharpweb.org/main/delong-book-history-prize/)

This important monograph is based on the author’s excellent Edinburgh PhD thesis in legal history, which was funded under the AHRC’s collaborative doctoral research scheme, which involved cooperation between the University and the National Library for Scotland.

baston

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Slavery: MOOC

Readers of this Blog will know of its interest in the history of slavery and its modern consequences. It may be of interest to readers to note that professor Kevin Bales, author of, for example, Disposable People, will, with others be offering what promises to be an interesting and informative MOOC, entitled, Ending Slavery: Strategies for Contemporary Global Abolition. See https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/slavery

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Codex of Justinian

Today marks the publication of the eagerly awaited new translation into English of the Codex of Justinian by Bruce Frier et al. This new edition, the first since the rather flawed translation into English by Scott, consists of the Latin and Greek texts with the English facing. It is loosely based on the translation by Fred Blume. Although the price is horrific, it will no doubt be a welcome addition to many libraries:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Codex-Justinian-Hardback-Set-Translation/dp/0521196825/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473316583&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=codex+iustinian

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Scholarship Opportunities – English Legal History

This blogger is delighted to share the following two calls for application:

EARLY MODERN ENGLISH LEGAL HISTORY

 

Applications are invited for a scholarship leading to the degree of PhD in the School of Law, University of Adelaide

 

The scholarship is supported by the Australian Research Council under Discovery Project DP160100265: ‘A New History of Law in Post-Revolutionary England, 1689 – 1760’ (Chief Investigators: Em. Prof Wilfrid Prest and Prof David Lemmings, University of Adelaide, and Dr Mike Macnair, University of Oxford).

 

The successful candidate will pursue research leading to a PhD on some aspect of the English legal order, c.1689-1760. Prof. Prest is particularly interested in supervising research on case notes and law reporting or another aspect of legal literature during the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. However candidates are encouraged to outline (in no more than 250 words) any proposal they may have for a thesis topic related to the overall field of study.

 

Applicants must be acceptable as candidates for a PhD degree at the University of Adelaide. International candidates are welcome, as are Australian citizens and permanent residents.

 

The scholarship will be for three years full-time study, with a stipend of $31,288 per annum. It is likely to be tax exempt, subject to Taxation Office approval. Applications close on 31 October 2016.

 

Enquiries: Prof. Em. Wilfrid Prest, Adelaide Law School Tel +61 (08) 8313 5883

Fax +61(08) 8313 4344

Email: wilfrid.prest@adelaide.edu.au

 

Application for Admission by domestic students must be submitted using the Online Application Form available at: https://hdrapp.adelaide.edu.au/auth/login

 

International students should use the Online Application Form available at: https://international-hdr.adelaide.edu.au/login

 

Please email a summary of your application for admission to Dr. Helen Payne with “Application for Legal History PhD Scholarship” in the subject heading.

You can request a copy of your application summary by emailing scholarships@adelaide.edu.au with the subject heading ‘Request for application summary’.

 

***

University of Adelaide

Judges and English Law Scholarship
School of Humanities/ Discipline of History

 

Applications are invited for the following scholarship leading to the degree of PhD in the School of Humanities (History)

 

The scholarship is supported by the Faculty of Arts (Divisional Scholarship), and is part of an Australian Research Council Discovery Project, DP160100265: ‘A New History of Law in Post-Revolutionary England, 1689 1760’ (Chief Investigators: Em. Prof Wilfrid Prest and Prof. David Lemmings, University of Adelaide, and Dr Mike Macnair, University of Oxford). The appointee will also be affiliated with the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions.

 

Field of Study: Prof. David Lemmings, who will supervise the successful candidate’s research, is interested in the social and cultural history of law and lawyers, 1690-1780, with a special emphasis on the history of emotions. The student may wish to undertake a comparative study of a group of judges from the period, with the aim of testing, further refining and extending both some of the generalizations advanced in previous research on the early Hanoverian judiciary, and of considering the representation of judges in the emerging print media. Candidates are encouraged to outline (in no more than 250 words) any proposal they may have for a specific thesis topic related to the overall field of study.
Eligibility: Applicants will have a minimum of Honours 2A result or equivalent in History or equivalent discipline, and must be citizens or permanent residents of Australia, or citizens of New Zealand, by the closing date.

Stipend: The scholarship will be for three years’ full-time study, with a stipend of $26,288 per annum (2016 rate) tax free for up to three years (indexed annually). It is likely to be tax exempt, subject to Taxation Office approval. The successful candidate will be eligible to apply for a top-up scholarship from the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions to the value of $5,000 p.a. stipend and $4,500 p.a. to assist with travel and research expenses.
Enquiries: Prof. David Lemmings School of Humanities, Discipline of History Tel (08) 8313 5614

Fax (08) 8313 3443 or Email david.lemmings@adelaide.edu.au
Applying: Application for Admission must be submitted using the Online Application Form available at: https://hdrapp.adelaide.edu.au/auth/login

 

Please email a summary of your application for admission to Dr. Helen Payne (helen.payne@adelaide.edu.au) with ‘Application for Judges and English Law. PhD Scholarship’ in the subject heading.

You can request a copy of your application summary by emailing scholarships@adelaide.edu.au with the subject heading ‘Request for application summary’.
Closing date: 31 October 2016

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Conference notification

The call for papers for the Edinburgh Postgraduate Law Conference 2017, is now open. To be eligible for consideration, abstracts must be submitted by 14 October 2016. The conference will be held at the University of Edinburgh, in January 2017.

The conference is open to both postgraduate students and early career researchers. This year, with the support of the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Legal History, we are particularly seeking contributions that relate to the field of Legal History.

The call for papers can be found here: http://eplc.org.uk/call-for-abstracts/

General information about the conference can be found here: http://eplc.org.uk/

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New Director for the Centre for Legal History

As of 1 August 2016, the Centre has a new Director. Dr Paul du Plessis, Senior Lecturer in Civil Law and Legal History at Edinburgh Law School, has taken over from Professor John W. Cairns who served as Director of the Centre for many years.

The Centre for Legal History provides a lively social and scholarly focus for the active research community – faculty members, postdoctoral researchers, and postgraduate students – in legal history, including Civil (Roman) law, in the School of Law. The University has a long tradition in the field, as the Chair of Civil Law was founded in 1710, with Civil Law taught continuously in the University since then. The Centre has a reputation for success in postgraduate study. Major interests pursued are Roman law, the learned laws in the Middle Ages, the history of law in Europe, the history of Scots law, and legal history in Louisiana. The interests of the Centre avoid a narrow focus on law as rules, and research is typically comparative and interdisciplinary, drawing on a wide range of sources. The location of the Centre in one of the world’s leading research universities, with access to excellent resources and research collections not only in the University but also in the city of Edinburgh, make it an ideal location for legal historical research.

The Centre organises a number of seminars and lecture programmes. The Edinburgh Roman Law Group, founded by the late Professor Peter B. H. Birks when he held the Chair of Civil Law in Edinburgh, presents a regular and lively programme of speakers on Roman law. The Alan Watson Seminar for Legal History, also initiated by Professor Birks, holds interdisciplinary seminars on medieval and early modern law in historical context. A more recent initiative is the programme of Ancient Law in Context organised with Ancient History (in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology). This offers an interdisciplinary research network exploring law and economic and social development, bringing together specialists in ancient law and all aspects of ancient history – social, economic, and political. The Henry Goudy Seminar meets once a month during term time to discuss works of classical literature. Finally, the Centre holds the biennial (sometimes annual) Peter Chiene Lecture, bringing in a distinguished legal historian to speak. From time to time, the Centre also sponsors and organises specialist conferences and seminars, such as those on the medieval ius commune (from casus to regula) and humanism (ad fontes).

The Centre also holds relaxed social events through the year.

The Centre seeks to engage with the wider community, and does this largely through its blog, the Edinburgh Legal History Blog, which is written by John W. Cairns, Paul J. du Plessis, Guido Rossi, Karen Baston, and guests including current legal history students at Edinburgh Law School.

Find out more about the Centre for Legal History

Members and Associates of the Centre for Legal History

Forthcoming Events at the Centre for Legal History

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Workshop Announcement – Law in Theory and History: a Neglected Dialogue

The Centre for Legal History and the Centre for Legal Theory are proud to announce a joint workshop on the above-mentioned theme. The idea for this workshop arose from two edited collections produced by Maks del Mar and Michael Lobban (Legal Theory and Legal History (2014) and their newly published Law in Theory and History (2016)). The rationale for this workshop takes its cue from the blurb of the most recent work: “Legal historians have often been sceptical of theory. The methodology, which informs their own work is often said to be an empirical one, of gathering information from the archives and presenting it in a narrative form. The narrative produced by history is often said to be provisional, insofar as further research in the archives might falsify present understandings and demand revisions. On the other side, legal theorists are often dismissive of historical works. History itself seems to many theorists not to offer any jurisprudential insights of use for their projects: at best, history is a repository of data and examples, which may be drawn on by the theorist for her own purposes. The aim of this collection is to invite participants from both sides to ask what lessons legal history can bring to legal theory, and what legal theory can bring to history. What is the theorist to do with the empirical data generated by archival research? What theories should drive the historical enterprise, and what wider lessons can be learned from it?”

This blurb will form the springboard for the topics discussed during this workshop. Rather than focusing solely on these two books, the aim of this workshop is to bring together a diverse range of scholars working on different fields to debate the merits of legal history and legal theory in dialogue. Speakers are encouraged to produce papers about their own fields of interest, but within the broader theme of the workshop.

Venue: The University of Edinburgh, School of Law

Date and time: Friday 28 April 2017 9 am – 6 pm

Invited speakers:

Professor Caroline Humfress (St Andrews)
Professor John Hudson (St Andrews)
Professor Michael Lobban (LSE)
Professor Tom Gallanis (Iowa)
Dr Chloë Kennedy (Edinburgh)
Dr Stephen Bogle (Glasgow)
Dr Paul J. du Plessis (Edinburgh)
Dr Daniel Carr (Edinburgh)
Dr Maks del Mar (QMUL)

Professor Claudio Michelon (Edinburgh) will act as session chair.

Each speaker will have 45 minutes plus 15 minutes for discussion. The workshop will end with dinner. Accommodation will be provided in the Kenneth McKenzie Hospitality Suite for those coming from outside Edinburgh.

Invited speakers are requested to sent their titles and a short abstract of no more than 500 words to Paul du Plessis no later than 1 December 2016.

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Professor Peter Stein (1926 – 2016)

Many of us in the legal history field will by now have heard the sad news of the passing of Peter Stein this past week.

The Squire Law Library at Cambridge recorded a number of conversations with him about his life and career in the context of their Eminent Scholars Archive.

These may be accessed here:

http://www.squire.law.cam.ac.uk/eminent-scholars-archive/professor-peter-stein

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Max Planck Summer Academy for Legal History 2016

An entry by our guest blogger, Peter Candy.

This year’s summer academy at the Max-Planck-Institut für europäische Rechtsgeschichte in Frankfurt was held on the special theme of ‘multinormativity’. The central idea underpinning this concept is that legal historians should be sensitive to other normative orders besides that of the state when investigating the operation of past legal systems. Multinormativity forms part of the wider methodological framework of ‘global legal history’, which advocates an appreciation of ‘legal spaces’, the different ways of resolving conflict, and processes of ‘translation’ between legal cultures.
The academy was attended by students of a range of disciplines with representatives from Asia, the Americas, and Europe. The teaching consisted of lectures from leading legal historians: among them, Thomas Duve (University of Frankfurt and MPI Director), Wim Decock (KU Leuven), and Michael Stolleis (University of Frankfurt and former MPI Director). Talks on European Union law were also given by two former Jurisconsults of the European Parliament: Gregorio Garzón Clariana and Christian Pennera. Between lectures the students of the academy were invited to present the progress of their own research, with time left each afternoon to access the institute’s library.
Aside from teaching the institute organised excursions, such as a tour of the Campus Westend (now the site of Goethe-Universität). The Campus, which avoided destruction during WWII, was formerly the headquarters of IG Farben – once the fourth largest company in the world and long-time sponsor of the Nazi Party. After the war the buildings were used as a military and administrative base by General Eisenhower and the American armed forces. Students were free to travel at the weekend: Mainz provided a main attraction, including visits to St. Martinus-Dom, the Gutenberg Museum, and the Museum of Ancient Seafaring. In Frankfurt itself there were opportunities to visit the house of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, as well as the castle at Höchst and the many museums in the city.
Special thanks are to be extended to Dr. Stefanie Rüther and Nicole Pasakarnis for their organisation of the academy, as well as to the Max Planck Institute for its generosity in funding. Students contemplating applications in the future should be encouraged by the opportunity to learn at the leading research institute dedicated to European – and indeed global – legal history.

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